877-395-6200

Drive Other Car Coverage – Part 1


     Vehicles that are owned or supplied by a business, non-owned and rented cars represent a problem when they are insured under a basic business auto policy. Such policies either provide little or no coverage when a loss involves personal use or use by a person who is NOT the vehicle’s owner. Serious coverage gaps may exist, such as:

 

1. A basic business auto policy does not provide liability coverage for operating a hired or non-owned car. The individual is only covered while driving their company owned vehicle

 

Example: Joe has no personal auto policy since his employer supplies and insures the car he drives. One day Joe accompanies his friend to a bachelor’s party. Later in the evening, his friend drinks too much and asks Joe to drive them both home. On the way, his friend passes out, distracting Joe from noticing a stop sign. Joe crashes into a minivan. The friend had minimum limits on his policy and Joe is left with no insurance coverage for the damages and injury he caused.

 

2. No coverage exists for the individual’s spouse or other family members for medical payments, uninsured motorist or underinsured motorist.

Don’t Dine And Drive


Distracted drivers cause accidents. While you may suspect that this article is going to provide another warning about the danger of using cell phones in traffic….this warning is much more low-tech. While having conversing on cell phones behind the steering wheel continues to cause problems, a bigger problem lies with plain old eating and drinking. In fact, of all accidents involving distractions, 80% involve eating and drinking.

The most food-related accidents happen in the morning (prime eating time as folks are running late to work or school). Certain types of food and drinks are among the most popular and dangerous distractions, specifically:

  • Coffee
  • Hot soup
  • Tacos
  • Chili
  • Hamburgers
  • Barbecue
  • Fried chicken
  • Filled or Powdered Donuts
  • Soft Drinks
  • Chocolate

A lot of preparation accompanies the act of eating and drinking. Consider fumbling around with sandwich wrappers, adding sweeteners or cream to tea or coffee, putting in straws for cold drinks (how about getting poked in the eye with a straw), devoting one arm/hand for handling food or drink, dealing with condiments. Drivers who eat and drink also face reacting to spills; particularly when they involve something very messy or worse, very hot.

The key issue for drivers to remember is that, no matter one's amount of experience; driving is difficult and dangerous. All forms of distraction should be avoided, or at least kept to a minimum. You and the persons sharing the roadways with you will be better off if you focus on driving and not on a meal.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

Example: Cindy and her parents drive her dad’s company-owned car, so they don't have a personal auto policy. Cindy’s pal, Karen, invites her to go shopping at a mall. Halfway there, a pick-up strikes Karen’s car and Cindy was seriously injured. The other driver was uninsured and Karen’s policy carried minimum uninsured motorists (UM) limits. Cindy’s family had to bear the expenses that weren't handled by Karen's UM coverage.

 

3. No coverage is provided for physical damage losses to any hired or non-owned car.

 

Example: Ginger hated the boredom and inconvenience of driving her husband’s company car, the only one in the household. Her neighbor, Jake, was selling his sports car, which he couldn’t afford to insure. Ginger liked the car, so she took it for a test drive. However, she took a sharp turn too fast, ran off the road and hit a tree, demolishing Jake’s car. She had to pay for the damages herself since the insurance on her husband's company car did not cover the loss.

 

     There is an option that could close these gaps. A business auto policy could be amended with Drive Other Car Coverage. This option can be used expand the policy to list and protect other persons and situations. Typically, the following coverages are provided by the option:

  • Liability
  • Auto Medical Payments
  • Uninsured Motorists
  • Underinsured Motorists
  • Physical Damage

Please see part two of Drive Other Car Coverage to see how this option works.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

Drive Other Car Coverage – Part 2


In Part 1, we mentioned that households who don’t have personal auto coverage because the vehicle they use is owned by a business face coverage gaps. The gaps are due to the limitations of basic commercial auto coverage. However, the problems may be addressed by adding an option called Drive Other Car Coverage. The option is usually flexible to meet various needs.

 

     The additional protection can extend liability coverage to non-owned or hired vehicles as long as the amended policy lists all members in the driving household. There are two exceptions. First, no member of the household can own the vehicle. Second, the vehicle cannot be one involved with running a business as a car dealer, repair operation or parking lot.

     Let’s revisit Joe from Part 1. Remember that Joe hit a minivan when he ran a stop sign. The accident happened while he was operating a friend’s car. If Joe’s commercial auto policy was amended by a Drive Other Car form, he would have coverage up to the amount that appears in that form. Coverage would apply to the damage and injury caused by Joe.

 

     A Drive Other Car Coverage form extends Auto Medical Payments and Uninsured and Underinsured Motorists Coverage to protect non-owned and hired vehicles when driven by any member of the insured household. For instance, in Part one we discussed Cindy, who was injured as a passenger while returning home from a shopping trip. Under a policy modified by Driver Other Car coverage, Cindy would be covered for underinsured motorist coverage.

 

     Another issue handled by a Drive Other Car Coverage option is Physical Damage Coverage for non-owned or hired vehicles. The coverage expands the definition of covered auto to include a private passenger type vehicle that is under the control of the scheduled individual and the spouse. In the situation in part one featuring Ginger and Jake, the same tree abuse happens during the test drive, but this time the company policy on her husband’s car is modified by a Drive Other Car Coverage option. That insurance will pay Jake for the damage to his vehicle.

 

     If your household’s vehicle situation is similar to what has been discussed, you might want to get together with an insurance professional to arrange for proper coverage.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Pimped Out Rides


Parents find it particularly stressful when our children become drivers. The stress increases as they evolve from part-time drivers of their parents' cars to full-time operators of their own autos. It’s likely you have already insured your young driver against injury or damage that he or she could cause to other people. However, are you sure that their car is also properly covered….especially in the age of "pimped-out" vehicles?

If you're not familiar with the term "pimped-out," it's slang for cars that have been customized for flash and performance. Many young drivers operate such cars and it can have an effect on their coverage. Even if you bought insurance to cover damage caused by collision or other sources of loss to your child's car, it might not be enough. That protection is based on the car's value according to its original manufacture. If hundreds or even thousands of dollars’ worth of additional features have been added to the car, there won’t be enough coverage to handle a significant loss.

"Pimped-out" cars may merely have a special paint job or could involve a complete vehicular makeover. Some features that can be part of the process include:

  • flashy custom paint jobs (including murals)
  • custom hub caps (including spinners or motorized caps)
  • mirror-finished chromed parts and features (such as special tail pipes)
  • window tinting
  • re-upholstered seats (such as leather and/or embroidered)
  • decorated dash boards
  • special floor mats
  • hydra-pumps
  • special hydraulic pumps or shock controls
  • body cut-outs (roofs, doors)
  • custom electronic sound systems
  • special navigation equipment
  • DVDs, computer equipment

Why not take a fresh look at your child's "ride" and call the (agency name) to talk about "pimping out" their insurance coverage?


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Cars Yes, Drivers No – Part 1


From the first time a parent, caretaker, friend or professional instructor let us behind a car’s steering wheel, a high concern for safety was drummed into us. Continuously we were admonished to watch for pedestrians, keep our hands on the wheel, wear a seat belt, don’t be distracted, obey traffic signs and traffic lights, don’t drink and drive, don’t use cell phones, etc. Warnings about being a safer driver never ended….and that is a good thing. Driving a vehicle with a proper level of respect and awareness are keys to avoiding accidents. For most of the history of vehicle use, the number one element of driving safety had to do with the operator. That is no longer true. We have reached the point at which safe vehicle operation depends much less upon drivers and much more on vehicle technology.

Smart Cars

The time has arrived for smart cars and autonomous vehicles. While they are often used as synonyms, there is a difference. Smart cars are cars that are equipped with a high level of active, crash avoidance technology (CAT) but which still requires a full-time, human operator. CAT, as the name states, consists of various forms of technology that decrease the probability of having auto accidents. On the other hand, autonomous vehicles contain more such technology as well as substantial other features that displace humans as operators.

Some forms of CAT have been around for many years, such as rear crash avoidance taillights and antilock brakes. Most forms are fairly new and are more sophisticated….sophisticated to the point that vehicles are becoming safer because they are increasingly capable of communication. Following are examples of CAT:

  • Adaptive cruise control
  • Adaptive headlights
  • Blind spot detectors
  • Electronic stability control
  • Fatigue warning system
  • Forward collision Avoidance Systems
  • Lane departure warning systems
  • Park assist and back over prevention systems

These devices and systems make use of cameras, monitors, wireless capability, radar and indicators. The result is that they enable vehicles to detect accident threats and to either warn a driver or take independent action to decrease a threat. The technology allows monitoring of speed, lane use, proximity detection and other measures which, in smart vehicles, warn a driver and, in autonomous vehicles, result in automatic adjustments.

Please see part two of this article for move on autonomous vehicles.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Cars Yes, Drivers No – Part 2


Note: Please see part one of this article that discusses smart cars.

Autonomous Vehicles

As is the case with smart cars, autonomous vehicles are also loaded with safety devices that minimize the occurrence of accidents. Also called driverless car, robot car, automated car or self-driving car, Autonomous vehicles (AVs), while not common, are a reality. A variety of companies are developing and testing such vehicles including traditional auto manufacturers and technology companies.

AVs are designed, not to assist with driving, but to take the place of human navigation. AVs are equipped to navigate traffic between various destination points. They are fully interactive with its environment, responding to other vehicles, driving conditions, sensing pedestrians, other objects and traffic control systems.

While the amount of AV development is staggering, testing of such vehicles are on-going, both in the U.S. and other parts of the world, especially Europe. Authorities in other countries have allowed looser restrictions on AV testing than the U.S. Regardless the restrictions, testing proceeds because of the possible benefits of making AVs viable.

  • AVs have the potential to be economically disruptive as well as transformative. Commonly cited benefits include:
    substantive reduction in the number of traffic accidents as well as traffic deaths and injuries
  • More efficient and quicker traffic flow
  • Expanded use of vehicles as recreational and work spaces, particularly in more hazardous, off-road or dangerous cargo situations
  • Reduction in use of valuable land for vehicle parking and storage
  • More efficient fuel use

On the other hand, there are many negatives that accompany AVs including:

  • Reduced need for human drivers in numerous transportation jobs
  • Elimination of vehicle service, repair and maintenance jobs
  • Reduced need for hotels/motels are vehicles can be occupied during continuous travel
  • Elimination of jobs in alternative transportation sources
  • Loss of related insurance and risk management jobs
  • Increase in cyber-attack exposures, including use of vehicles in terrorism

Smart and autonomous vehicles still need insurance, but the increased presence of technology will have as big an effect on the role of insurance as it does on increased traffic safety.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.


Can I Afford My New Driver?


Young drivers are expensive to insure. Such drivers, particularly teenagers, frequently cause traffic accidents because of their lack of experience and because, due to their youth, they tend to be distracted, risky drivers. If your household is about to add a new driver, make sure that he or she understands that, besides endangering themselves and others, poor driving habits can result in higher premiums or a canceled policy. Here are some methods to help minimize the cost of a new driver:

  •  Have your child complete a driver training class. The class’ cost is easily offset by lower insurance premiums. You also gain a more competent young driver.
  •  Ask your insurer if it gives discounts to students with good grades.
  • URGE against texting and driving.
  • Find a company that charges a rate according to the car your new driver usually drives instead of assigning him or her to the most expensive vehicle.
  • Try to discourage or delay your child’s driving to school. Insurers charge a lower premium for less frequent driving.
  • Build a long-term relationship with your insurer. Some companies reward longevity by forgiving a driver's first accident or minor traffic violation.
  • Increase your physical damage deductibles or, for older vehicles, eliminate this coverage.
  • If your child owns a vehicle, he or she should have a separate policy. However, if you share the cost of the car and its insurance, it may make sense to also own or co-own the vehicle. Your ownership interest lets you take advantage of a multiple-car discount.
  • Think carefully about giving a young driver his or her own car. Coverage for young drivers who have full-time access to a vehicle is very expensive. Make sure you balance the considerations of convenience, cost and safety.

Don’t pursue lower premiums blindly. It's important that your young driver is protected from the financial consequences of causing a serious accident. Further, you may need to protect yourself since you could also be sued for an accident caused by your son or daughter. You might consider getting higher limits of liability by purchasing an umbrella policy. Talk to an insurance professional about more strategies to keep your new driver affordable.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.


Can I Keep My New Driver Safe?


New drivers can send a parent’s stress-level soaring. Here are some strategies to control a young driver's impact on your peace of mind.

  • Consider preparing your child with a course in defensive driving as a tool for avoiding accidents and increasing that driver’s confidence.
  • Require your young driver to understand, sign and comply with the Youthful Operator Driver Safety Agreement.
  • Be a proper model by using seat belts and never using alcohol or drugs.
  • Provide your child with a well-maintained vehicle, equipped with air bags and anti-lock brakes. Also, avoid vehicles that are vulnerable to serious damage during collisions or due to "rolling over."
  • Control your child's driving privileges...don't hesitate to curtail or revoke them in response to poor behavior.
  • Be certain that he or she can properly pass vehicles, maintain a correct distance, park, merge and exit, change lanes, make turns, obey speed limits and be aware of pedestrians.
  • Make sure your child understands traffic laws and has a healthy respect for the power of the automobile.

Don't let your child become licensed until he or she passes YOUR driving test which must include the ability to drive under adverse conditions (dark, fog, rain, ice, snow, rush-hour traffic, etc.). Another good idea is to talk to an insurance expert about other strategies to keep your new driver safer.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.


Driver Safety Agreement


My Driver Safety Agreement

Driving is a privilege that I may lose by violating this agreement. This privilege may be suspended for other reasons such as (but not limited to) unsatisfactory school grades and violations of family trust.

  • I will obey any curfews or restrictions imposed by my driver's license.
  • I will obey all traffic laws and speed limits.
  • I will not drink and drive, or use illegal drugs, or drive if I am taking ANY medication that may affect my driving.
  • I will not ride with anyone whom I know or suspect is under the influence of alcohol or drugs (legal, or illegal).
  • I will not permit any open or empty containers of alcohol, or transport anyone who I know or suspect may be carrying illegal drugs in any vehicle I operate.
  • I will not ride in any vehicle where I know there are empty or open containers of alcohol or where anyone who I know or suspect may be carrying illegal drugs.
  • I agree not to drive with or transport anyone who is in possession of any weapon.
  • I will always wear my seatbelt and shoulder harness. I will not ride in any vehicle in which there are more people than seat belts.
  • I will make certain that I can always hear emergency vehicles and traffic sounds.
  • I will drive defensively.
  • I will avoid being a distracted driver, particularly avoiding texting or operating a cell or smartphone.
  • I will not transport passengers unless they are properly secured by a seatbelt.
  • I will always wear a helmet if I am driving or riding on a motorcycle. I will not transport a passenger unless he or she also wears a helmet.
  • I will drive in a manner that respects the safety of myself, my passengers, other drivers and pedestrians.
  • I will ignore peer pressure. While driving, I am in control. I can stop and ask others to leave my vehicle and, as a passenger, I can ask a driver to stop and let me out.
  • I will not drive unless I feel safe and certain of my ability.
  • I will be especially alert during dangerous conditions such as rain, snow, sleet, wind, heavy traffic, fog, unlit roads, construction zones, and accident scenes.
  • I will always lock every door and take the keys when I leave the vehicle. I will park in areas where I believe the vehicle will be safe from damage or theft.
  • I will obey the driving instructions of my parent(s) and of law enforcement officers.

Additional Conditions Required By My Parent(s):
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
I have read, understood and I will comply with this agreement.
Signed______________________ Witnessed_________________________
Date:_______________________


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 


Personal Auto Symbols


Premiums for covering physical damage or loss to a car are based on factors such as the auto’s original cost, horsepower, size, weight, model year, and vulnerability to damage. Other factors that affect the cost of coverage are sports features (speed, handling, styling, seat capacity, etc.) and the amount of standard, but expensive electronic features such as onboard diagnostics. These items are reflected in a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and this information is used by insurance companies to determine codes called auto symbols. Higher symbols are assigned to more expensive cars such as Mercedes, Ferrari, and similar vehicles which represent the ultimate in luxury, styling, sportiness, etc. Lower symbols are assigned to modest cars.

Other Characteristics That Affect Symbols

Insurance companies seriously consider vehicle safety features and other factors when assigning a symbol. Vehicles that are known for their safe performance (for instance, Volvos, Saabs, etc.) receive lower symbols than comparably priced sedans without such features. Two-seater, high horsepower vehicles often receive a symbol much higher than their actual value because of their high performance nature. Such cars are built to attract drivers who take advantage of the speed and handling ability of their cars (riskier drivers).
An insurer may modify a symbol based upon the damage repair cost history of a vehicle. This can happen a few months or several years after a new model is introduced. Symbol changes are also made for vehicles that are prone to special dangers such as vehicle rollover or gas tank explosions.

Why You Should Consider Symbols?

Symbols directly affect the cost to insure a car. Ask your agent about the differences that features make before buying a car. A simple decision such as selecting a four door vs. a two door model could eventually make the difference in hundreds of dollars in additional insurance costs. Another consideration is that premiums are based only on factory built cars with factory installed options. Options installed by dealers or custom auto shops may not be covered unless they are reported. When an insurer is made aware of such extras, an additional premium will be charged…but that is off-set by having additional coverage when it’s needed.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Amboy - Main Office

111 S. Main St.

P.O. Box 157 Amboy, IN 46911

Main office: 765-395-7761
Toll free: 877-395-6200
Fax: 765-395-7763

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Bunker Hill Office

132 East Broadway

P.O. Box 356 Bunker Hill, IN 46914

Main office: 765-689-8432
Toll free: 800-688-8432
Fax: 765-689-0725

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Converse Office

105 South Jefferson Street

P.O. Box 620 Converse, IN 46919

Main office: 765-395-7811
Fax: 765-395-6216

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Fairmount Office

210 South Main Street

P.O. Box 67 Fairmount, IN 46928

Main office: 765-948-4129
Fax: 765-948-4120

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Flora Office

15 East Columbia Street

Flora, IN 46929

Main office: 574-967-3110
Toll free: 800-242-0466
Fax: 574-967-3569

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Greentown Office

109 North Meridian Street

Greentown, IN 46936

Main office: 765-628-7572
Fax: 765-507-9144

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Hartford City Office

209 West Washington Street

Hartford City, IN 47348

Main office: 765-348-1448
Fax: 765-348-1512

Office Hours:

Mon: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Kokomo Office

3833 South LaFountain Street

P.O. Box 6339 Kokomo, IN 46904

Main office: 765-455-2700
Fax: 765-453-5635

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Lafayette Office

3904 Regal Valley Dr

Lafayette, IN 47909

Main office: 765-838-8244
Toll free: 877-395-6200
Fax: 765-838-8244

Office Hours:

Mon: By Appointment
Tues: By Appointment
Wed: By Appointment
Thurs: By Appointment
Fri: By Appointment
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: By Appointment

Marion Office

153 East 3rd Street

Marion, IN 46952

Main office: 765-662-2010
Toll free: 800-688-3548
Fax: 765-662-2072

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Peru Office

26 West Main Street

Peru, IN 46970

Main office: 765-473-4519
Fax: 765-473-4510

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Somerset Office

1 Main Street

P.O. Box 176 Somerset, IN 46984

Main office: 765-981-4944
Fax: 765-981-4116

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Swayzee Office

106 South Washington Street

P.O. Box 130 Swayzee, IN 46986

Main office: 765-922-4449
Fax: 765-922-4449

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Upland Office

50 East Berry Avenue

P.O. Box 537 Upland, IN 46989

Main office: 765-998-6053
Fax: 765-998-7083

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Walton Office

112 North Depot Street

Walton, IN 46994

Main office: 574-626-2621
Fax: 574-626-2609

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

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