765-395-7761

DEDUCTIBLES


Whether we insure our car, our home, our boat, our personal property or our business, there is a basic premise of insurance that underlies them all…..sharing in losses that occur to them. A more common term for loss-sharing is deductible. A deductible is the amount which must first be subtracted from the total damage that occurs and the remaining amount is the financial responsibility of the insurance company (at least up to the policy limit).

Deductibles serve a couple of very important objectives. First, deductibles allow insurance companies to save money by not having to respond to frequently occurring, minor losses. In other words, a million one-dollar losses still add up to a million dollars. Second, deductibles create an incentive for insurance consumers to make the effort to eliminate or mitigate losses. Deductibles, as used in property insurance, can come in different forms such as the following:

Disappearing Deductible – A disappearing deductible is a dollar amount deducted from the amount of loss which is reduced as the size of losses increase, finally disappearing entirely when a loss reaches a certain, specified figure.

Flat deductible – A set dollar amount that will be subtracted from each claim or loss. The given amount appears in the policy and it does not vary with each loss.

Franchise deductible - A provision that no loss is paid by the insurance company when the loss amount is less than an agreed amount called the franchise; but if the damage equals or exceeds the franchise, the company pays the entire amount.

Straight deductible – Another term for flat deductible.

Aggregate deductible - Under this deductible provision, an insured qualifies for an insurance payment only after all eligible, incurred losses during the policy year exceed the established deductible amount.

Percentage deductible – Also known as a participating deductible, it is a stated proportion of any loss that occurs, such as 5% or 10%.

Waiting Period – A given amount of time (usually in hours or days) that must pass after a covered loss occurs before any coverage takes effect.

Although not called a deductible, a coinsurance clause qualifies as one. The clause requires a property owner to maintain insurance at least equal to a stipulated percentage of the property’s full (replacement) value at the time of loss. A formula is used to determine the amount of coverage the property owner is due when a loss occurs.

Regardless the form, deductibles are a valuable tool in keeping insurance both affordable and available.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2013

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

New Ways for Old Policies


The only thing that remains constant over time is change. All forms of insurance policies have to deal with change. Most of them have to deal with how coverage is provided, including responding to developments from significant court cases and changes needed by parties covered by policies. But now, in the U.S., policy forms are facing changes in format and language and these are reflected by actions in various U.S. states. Specifically, different states are providing rules and laws regarding policies being offered in an electronic format and/or in other languages, typically Spanish.

Increasingly, the world is decreasing the use of paper in favor of electronic documents. This change results in greater accessibility, affordability and portability. This change is also motivated by a higher concern to be “green” by reducing use of resources and waste (no discarded paper). 

So far, states that allow insurance companies to provide policies electronically must comply with provisions such as the following:

·         Insurer must make policies (as well as endorsements and promotional materials) in popular computer formats

·         Insurer must exclude any data that makes it possible to identify a policyholder

·         The policyholder must be notified when materials are available on-line

·         The materials must be accessible throughout the time the information is in effect

·         Such materials must be in a format that is approved by a given state

·         Policyholders must have a free method of printing such materials

Different states may have other requirements, but the above represents core items.

With regard to providing forms in a different language, states again take the lead in setting parameters. The incentive for using policies in other languages is spurred by a desire to offer forms that are more readily understood. Those with little or no proficiency in English are at a serious disadvantage with policies that only appear in that language. Having a policy, as well as endorsements, brochures, etc., available in another language greatly aids the ability to evaluate different coverage options, buy insurance and understand loss situations.

States do have to deal with a particularly important and related issue. How are such polcies handled when a loss occurs? Policy wording in English may have significantly different meanings when translated and issued in other languages. Many terms and phrases have special meanings that are recognized by courts. Translated insurance form language may include significantly different interpretations.

For the time being, states and courts handle the above situation by defaulting on the use of the original, English version of a given form when they are subject to claims or lawsuits. While this may be confusing, this combined treatment allows non-English speaking policyholders to have a better understanding of their coverage, but still make them subject to the same handling in the courts as is faced by English-speaking policyholders.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2013

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

RESILIENCY


Sometimes the concepts of insurance and risk management can become clouded and confused. Something is often lost among the mechanics of arranging for coverage, what should be covered, how it should be covered and what costs are involved. Many fail to appreciate the real value of these concepts and may get to the point where they are considered merely expenses and barriers to other, more important objectives.

However, there is a way to view these concepts that lets you maintain a correct focus on what is involved and that is “resiliency,” the ability to recover or rebound to your original state or condition after experiencing adversity.

Our lives and our success in living them are so heavily dependent upon our ability to recover after loss and destruction. The value in assessing threats to loss that we face in our personal and business lives is in the power we gain by being able to recognize dangers. Once recognized, we also need to secure ways to eliminate, avoid or minimize these dangers.

Our embracing the concepts of risk management and one of its most effective tools, insurance, gives us a greater chance to meet our responsibilities to those who depend upon us. The reward we achieve is the creation of stronger individuals, families, businesses and economies. Economic survival is a good thing, but with the attitude of doing what we must to be resilient, we achieve great things.

We all win when we adopt the attitude to survive and then to thrive. Insurance and risk management give us options to rebound from adversity. Use them and appreciate their value.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2013

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Guaranty Funds


Each state has a guaranty fund. Their purpose is to minimize the loss to their citizen policyholders when an insurance company becomes financially impaired or insolvent. Various studies reveal that the following are among the most common reasons for insurance company failure:

  • Fraud (including falsified reports, concealing or altering key information, etc.)
  • Uncontrolled (rapid) expansion
  • Improper assignment of underwriting authority
  • Inadequate pricing
  • Lack of management expertise (especially with new or different lines of business)
  • Improper reserving
  • Insider activity
  • Inadequate or improper Reinsurance Agreements/Reinsurer Failure

Guaranty funds are, typically, mandated by various state laws and they usually focus on helping persons who are considered to be the most vulnerable to insurance carrier instability (such as auto, homeowners and small-sized commercial business).

Guaranty Funds collect assessments from participating insurers (all other insurers operating in a given state) whenever a need for funds is caused by an insurer’s fatal, financial impairment. The collected funds are used to handle claims suffered by policyholders of a failed insurer as well as pay the creditors and other parties owed money by the failed company. The fund is reimbursed by taking over and liquidating assets that are held by the insolvent insurer.

A state fund is usually called upon to handle payments once that state’s insurance commissioner formally declares that a given insurer is insolvent. Once that declaration is made, the state takes over operations and management of the company. 

Most state insurance regulators have a detailed program for monitoring the insurance companies that operate in their state. They require regular financial reporting and use a variety of tools that allow them to ascertain a given insurer’s financial state. If done properly, a vulnerable company should be identified and steps be taken to address the situation. Typically, a well-established set of financial tests are available to assist in evaluating an insurer.

Sometimes an alternative to the use of guaranty funds is used, called a run off. Under a run off, a company is kept in active operation, but it no longer processes new business or renewals. The goal is to dispose of business in an orderly fashion, without triggering guaranty funds reimbursements or assessments. Run offs are being used more often in handling impaired insurers.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc., 2013

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Insurance Surveys


Life consists of actions….activities, in both one’s personal and business worlds. Making products, selling goods, owning property, transporting goods, storing property; regardless the type of activities, they all create the possibility of losses.

Insurance is one of the ways to handle the, often, serious financial consequences of losses. However, it’s ineffective unless it is the right insurance. Depending upon your circumstances, it may be difficult to be confident that you have identified your exposures to loss accurately enough to select the insurance you need.

There is an excellent tool for ferreting out loss exposures, called insurance surveys. Surveys may range from simple, one-page versions to complex versions. Surveys, essentially, are a list of questions about your personal and business circumstances that are designed to discover as many significant sources of loss as possible. The survey answers then act as a guide for assembling a proper insurance program. At a minimum, surveys create a greater awareness of the loss exposures faced and, even if not handled by insurance, still provide valuable information that can help in seeking other methods of minimizing the possibility of loss.

Personal surveys can become more detailed as the assets owned by an individual rises. High income households have more property to protect and also tend to have a greater risk of being sued for damage or injury that arises from their activities. With regard to businesses, surveys become more detailed due to both an operation’s size as well as its type. For instance a small office survey would not be as detailed as one for a large office. However, any size retailer survey would likely be more complex than one for any size office.

Surveys are invaluable tools for getting crucial information to help protect one’s self or one’s business from the world of losses. Contact an insurance professional and arrange to complete one.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2014

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Takaful Insurance – Part 1


As it is in Western Culture, insurance coverage in the non-western world has roots in its cultural and economic history. That is certainly the case with takaful insurance which, in various forms, is used in a number of countries that follow Islamic (or Shari’ah) law.

Conventional Insurance vs. Takaful

Conventional insurance coverage, while still offering the basic option of mutual protection from pooled funds from contributors, most commonly exists in an expanded form that seeks to maximize financial benefits. Rather than restrict its goal to protecting against eligible losses, conventional insurance often maximizes its income potential by aggressively seeking opportunities via activities such as the following:

  • use of selection and pricing practices to create underwriting profit
  • redeploying collected premium into various investments
  • recovering funds it has paid in losses from other parties that bear legal responsibility for such losses (subrogation)

Transversely, takaful arrangements reflect a desire to provide pure protection against certain forms of accidental loss. Due to the requirement of Shari’ah, it is forbidden to pursue certain financial activity that is commonplace in Non-Islamic countries. Islamic financial practices are indivisible from religious practice, so they share the following objections concerning conventional insurance:

  • Maeser – Gambling
  • Gharar – High Uncertainty
  • Riba - Interest

Therefore, takaful coverage must avoid any elements of speculation (gambling) or profit-taking, so the focus is upon achieving a fund pooling arrangement that focuses on providing mutual protection and maintaining that pure level of protection. 

Takaful Operator Models

Islamic practices and interpretations of law and permitted activities can vary significantly among countries. Therefore, there are different models of takaful operations. The main ones are:

  • Mudaraba (Partnership with Profit Sharing)
  • Wakala (Agency with Fees)
  • Hybrid (Profitsharing/Fees)

 

Please see part 2 of this article which discusses the Takaful Market and a role played by traditional insurers.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Takaful Insurance – Part 2


Please see part 1 of this article which discusses the background on Takaful Insurance.

Takaful Market

While there is significant growth in the global takaful market, the current level of coverage it provides as a percent of the total insurance market is still negligible. That was the case in countries that, currently, comprise the largest markets for takaful coverage. Specifically, the following:

  • Bahrain
  • Indonesia 
  • Malaysia
  • Pakistan
  • Saudi Arabia
  • United Arab Emirates 

One recent study by a conventional global insurer which has also entered the takaful market found that there are significant issues with takaful operations and product availability among the countries that provide takaful coverage. One issue is that there is a lack of product diversity and too little development has occurred on the commercial and retakaful market. The study suggests that these factors are a cause of the low level of market penetration common to all of the countries studied. Some greater market impact may come from Africa which, particularly via Kenya, Nigeria and Tunisia, is becoming an important emerging area in traditional insurance, microinsurance and, now takaful coverage. Another area of development is the interest of consumers who operate in traditional insurance markets. Some commercial operations have an increasing concern over transparency, sustainable coverage and social consciousness and there is interest in using takafulcoverage as a way to avoid possible entanglements with how corporate funds are used. There is some belief that conventional problems could be avoided if a more straightforward form of insurance coverage, such as takaful, is used.

Involvement of Traditional Insurers

Much of the drive for takaful growth, ironically, is coming from traditional insurers. Global insurance growth is assisted by achieving greater development and penetration of global markets. Some of the world’s largest insurers have begun embracing less traditional activities in order to reach out to underserved insurance markets, which are in parts of Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Services that have a more realistic chance for growth are microinsurance, takaful and retakaful (Islamic version of reinsurance).


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Internet Liability - Part 1


Each day more people decide to create their own Websites, blogs or otherwise participate in social media activities. The reasons for having a Website or blog vary, or other activities range from frivolity to earnestness. Personal Websites and blogs commonly describe the host, his or her family and interests such as a particular hobby, sports, profession, humor, etc. Whatever the reason for creating a Website or blog, they, along with social network activity can represent an additional source of loss that may require additional insurance. The loss potential is directly related to the purpose and content found on the Website.

New Opportunity For Old Losses

Website liability is an extension of the ages old accountability for what you say or write. Such responsibility extends to household members; so it's important to be aware of what a family's little E-wizard may be doing. The types of losses that may be created by a Website, blog, or social media activity include:

  • Libel - knowingly publishing false information that harms a person's reputation.
  • Invasion of Privacy - disclosing information that interferes with another party's peace of mind.
  • Infringement - violating or interfering with another's property rights or the right to pursue business

Oops, You May Not Be Covered

Most homeowner policies protect against liability for tangible injury to another person or for actual damage to another party's property. Liability created by publishing or broadcasting content typically involves personal (or non-physical) injury that is not covered by a typical homeowner policy. While individuals may be able to add protection (such as add-ons to a homeowner policy or umbrella coverage), certain losses may still be uncovered because they involve intended acts or business activity.

Can You Protect Yourself?

The good news is you can take steps to eliminate or, at least, minimize the possibility of facing electronic publishing-related loss. The first step is to identify areas of concern. The key to understanding and addressing any possible Website liability is to focus upon:

  • the nature of the Website or activity
  • the Website or account’s contents
  • who may be harmed by the site or activity
  • how a party may be harmed

It is important that you think hard about these issues and approach the job objectively. Your building a site, blogging or using social media just for "fun" could end with you explaining the punch line in court. Two people can interpret information in radically different ways. Use a method of examining your Website that helps you view it through "fresh" eyes that won't gloss over important facts. Asking the help of others could be a big plus.

See Part 2 for important considerations about Web activity.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Internet Liability - Part 2


Considerations For Your Web Site, Blog or Social Networking

If you or someone in your household operates or is building a Website, or is active with social media, you need to be aware that the site (or activity) could open you to legal situations. Here are some questions you should consider:

Who created the site or page?

Key consideration: depending upon the circumstances, a private party that created the site for you may share (or even own) the responsibility for damages caused by the site.

What is the purpose of your site or activity?

Key consideration: Is there ANY business activity or purpose? If so, you may have an immediate need to secure appropriate protection.

What content is found at your site or page?

Key consideration: Not only do you have to think about YOUR message, but you must think of other parties that appear at your site such as friends, companion businesses or even miscellaneous links.

Who do you intend to attract to the site and how do visitors use your page?

Key consideration: There's a big difference in the type of people you're targeting, such as inviting:

  • relatives to see baby pictures or family newsletters
  • customers to request product/service information or to place orders
  • hobbyists to distribute or solicit stories or advice
  • strangers to a forum for discussing sports, political or other topics

Is there anyone you would not want to see the site or page? Why?

Key consideration: Answering this question honestly is critical. It can identify prime sources for possible legal action against you. It may also suggest what precautions you may take, including the easiest action such as eliminating the reference to a person, group or organization.

Please see part 3 on precautions to take regarding operating a website.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

 

 

Internet Liability - Part 3


Does Your Site or Activity Create An Insurance Need?

After examining the key concerns about your Website, you should be prepared to take precautions which may include:

  • adding security features to your Website
  • changing the content
  • adding waivers or disclaimers about links or certain pages that appear on your site
  • adding user agreements to your site
  • creating guidelines on maintaining current and future content at the site
  • changing your homeowner coverage
  • buying additional or special personal or business liability insurance
  • adding or eliminating a guest book (if you have a guest book, pay close attention to what visitors say)
  • eliminating the Website

Once you've carefully examined your situation, a discussion with an insurance professional could be an excellent step to identify coverage needs which may include having to buy commercial coverage. The instant and widespread access represented by the Internet creates new perils for individuals. Don't hesitate to seek the help of an insurance professional or even competent legal advice.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.


Covering Funeral Directors


We’re born, we live and we die, and how we’re treated in death is surrounded by ritual and ceremony. For those who have suffered a loss, emotions rule and there’s a tremendous reliance on others to help commemorate the passing of a loved one. Funeral directors and morticians have a critical role and, because of their position, are vulnerable to lawsuits should plans go wrong.

Like any other businessperson, funeral directors and morticians need to have general liability protection to handle losses related to routine circumstances that could happen as easily at a gas station, grocery store, dance studio or tax office. But “general” coverage does NOT handle losses that are directly connected to their professional duties. Professional Liability coverage will differ according to the insurance company providing the protection because coverage is not standardized. Regardless, most policies will likely handle the following:

  • Bodily Injury - Coverage applies for any professional malpractice error or mistake in the embalming, handling, disposition, burial, disinterment or removal of any deceased human body or any conduct of any memorial service by the insured. Injuries involving burial rights as well as mental anguish are also covered.
  • Property Damage - may cover damage to or destruction of urns, caskets, linings or fittings, casket eases, crypts, mausoleums or similar facilities. Protection is also available for claims connected to loss of damage to property that is in the care (possession) of a funeral director and staff, such as a body as well as personal effects.
  • Defense - provides protection for the costs of providing a legal defense against claims and lawsuits. Care has to be taken about this coverage. It makes a huge difference whether these costs are provided as separate protection or if payments are deducted from the amount of policy limits purchased.
  • Exclusions – typically, such policies will not protect against intentional acts (fraud, misrepresentation and deliberately violating laws or regulations), contractual liability, losses involving motorized or animal drawn vehicles, losses to property owned by the funeral operation, losses involving medical wastes and chemicals and other sources of loss that are meant to be covered by other types of policies.

Funeral directors and the people who work for them have many, important responsibilities, including the need to contact an insurance professional to make sure they have protection for mistakes that they may make.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Amboy - Main Office

111 S. Main St.

P.O. Box 157 Amboy, IN 46911

Main office: 765-395-7761
Toll free: 877-395-6200
Fax: 765-395-7763

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Bunker Hill Office

132 East Broadway

P.O. Box 356 Bunker Hill, IN 46914

Main office: 765-689-8432
Toll free: 800-688-8432
Fax: 765-689-0725

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Converse Office

105 South Jefferson Street

P.O. Box 620 Converse, IN 46919

Main office: 765-395-7811
Fax: 765-395-6216

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Fairmount Office

210 South Main Street

P.O. Box 67 Fairmount, IN 46928

Main office: 765-948-4129
Fax: 765-948-4120

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Flora Office

15 East Columbia Street

Flora, IN 46929

Main office: 574-967-3110
Toll free: 800-242-0466
Fax: 574-967-3569

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Greentown Office

109 North Meridian Street

Greentown, IN 46936

Main office: 765-628-7572
Fax: 765-507-9144

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Hartford City Office

209 West Washington Street

Hartford City, IN 47348

Main office: 765-348-1448
Fax: 765-348-1512

Office Hours:

Mon: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Kokomo Office

3833 South LaFountain Street

P.O. Box 6339 Kokomo, IN 46904

Main office: 765-455-2700
Fax: 765-453-5635

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Lafayette Office

3904 Regal Valley Dr

Lafayette, IN 47909

Main office: 765-838-8244
Toll free: 877-395-6200
Fax: 765-838-8244

Office Hours:

Mon: By Appointment
Tues: By Appointment
Wed: By Appointment
Thurs: By Appointment
Fri: By Appointment
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: By Appointment

Marion Office

153 East 3rd Street

Marion, IN 46952

Main office: 765-662-2010
Toll free: 800-688-3548
Fax: 765-662-2072

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Peru Office

26 West Main Street

Peru, IN 46970

Main office: 765-473-4519
Fax: 765-473-4510

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Somerset Office

1 Main Street

P.O. Box 176 Somerset, IN 46984

Main office: 765-981-4944
Fax: 765-981-4116

Office Hours:

Mon: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tues: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wed: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thurs: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Swayzee Office

106 South Washington Street

P.O. Box 130 Swayzee, IN 46986

Main office: 765-922-4449
Fax: 765-922-4449

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Upland Office

50 East Berry Avenue

P.O. Box 537 Upland, IN 46989

Main office: 765-998-6053
Fax: 765-998-7083

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

Walton Office

112 North Depot Street

Walton, IN 46994

Main office: 574-626-2621
Fax: 574-626-2609

Office Hours:

Mon: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tues: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wed: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thurs: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sat: By Appointment
Sun: Closed

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